Posts for tag: scented over-the-counter products.

The following list of medications is certainly not all-inclusive since many different classes of

prescription and over-the-counter drugs can make the skin more sensitive to ultraviolet rays.

Some of the more popular photosensitizing medications include:

          Antibiotics: tetracycline,doxycycline hyclate(not the smaller-dose doxycycline found

in the brand name product "Oracea.") and sulfa-containing antibiotics such as trimethoprim/

sulfamethoxazole.

         Arthritis drugs: ibuprofen, naproxen

        Blood pressure/"water pill" drugs: hydrochlorthiazide(more a blood pressure drug than

a water pill) furosemide(more a water pill than a blood pressure drug).Both of these contain

sulfa,which is a photosensitizer.

       A recent study indicated that the calcium channel blocker nifedipine and the ACE

inhibitor lisinopril both increased sun-sensitivity and made users more likely to develop

lip cancer.

       Diabetes drugs: glipizide,glyburide, and chlorpropamide all contain sulfa and,therefore,

are more likely to be sun-sensitizers.

      Antihistamine:  the popular diphenhydramine

     Acne medications: include those related to Vitamin A such as  isotretinoin,tretinoin,and

acetretin.

    Anti-cancer(chemotherapy) drugs:  5-fluorouracil  and dacarbazine

    Psychiatric drugs such as the major tranquilizers chlorpromazine and the tricyclic 

antidepressants  desipramine and imipramine.

   External (topical) products such as scented or deordorant soaps, toiletries, cosmetics or fragrances

         In summary,  the benefit of these drugs probably outweighs the potential sun-senitivity side

effects (especially with the judicious use of sunscreens and sun exposure time). If not,they

should only be discontinued with the consent of the health care practitioner prescribing

them.

 

 

 



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